Adults in their 30s and 40s may have championed the tiny house movement, but a new demographic is reaping serious benefits from living small. It turns out that micro-sized homes offer seniors an appealing alternative to expensive assisted living.

If you think about it, the people who really need financial advisors are the ones who can’t afford them. If you’re impoverished or firmly in the middle class and can’t seem to make it to the next level, you’re the one who could really use financial advice. If you’re wealthy, you know what you’re doing.

Will 2018 be the year you finally retire and say goodbye to your job forever? If so, the next few months will come and go faster than you think. Use that time to do these 10 things, which will help ensure a smooth transition out of the workforce.

Office Worker

There’s a good chance that age will hurt your job chances, especially if you’re in your 50s or older, based on a recent Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco study. It isn’t easy to win a lawsuit proving that age was the reason you weren’t hired or were fired, but Forbes suggests four ways you may be able to do it.

Prevent Money Scams

Millions of older adults fall prey to financial scams every year. Use these tips from NCOA and the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement to protect yourself or an older adult you know.

Save time and money couponing

Couponing is more popular and more necessary than ever. You might think the couponing is too time-consuming, but you would be surprised. If you use these strategies, you could save a minimum of 15% off the average monthly grocery bill, and the time it takes is minimal.

 Most seniors these days are living on limited incomes from sources that may include Social Security, a small pension or maybe some other form of government assistance. With few resources at their disposal, finding services for free or discounted prices is vital. There are likely many of these types of services available through your local Office for the Aging (the name of this government agency may be different in your local area, i.e. Division of Senior Services) or local charities such as Lions Club or Meals-on-Wheels, or on the Internet through sites like ElderCare.gov.